You are currently browsing the August, 2011 archives.

Briefly…

Posted 2011.08.31 12.45 in Pointless Blather by Stephanie

More messing around with cameras. Some poor results not worth posting. More found film.

Not much else going on, nothing noteworthy or interesting.

 

A Snicker of Snail Sprouts

Posted 2011.08.24 10.03 in Aquaria by Stephanie

Or is it a bevy of snail babies?¬†Either way, it’s a [collective noun] of snail [youngsters].

From larger-than-a-pea to smaller-than-a-dot, it’s a platoon of Pomacea diffusa youngsters. And every last one of them is a cutie.

 

The Littlest SLR Camera!

Posted 2011.08.19 22.30 in Hobbies, Photography by Stephanie

During some recent internet roaming, I stumbled across some information about this camera and it was an instant had-to-have response. The smallest SLR camera system ever? Who could resist that?

Back in 1978/1979 when the Pocket Instamatic format was already losing popularity, Pentax came out with their first (and only) 110-format camera. They only made one, but they made it count! This is no simple one-speed one-aperture point-and-click plastic job. No way. This is a complete camera system.

Single Lens Reflex body, interchangable lenses, filters, dedicated electronic flash units, and motorized power winders… the Pentax Auto 110 was a full-fledged system camera, for a sub-miniature plastic cartridge format.

How small is it? In the image above, you can see the camera along with two spare lenses, a film cartridge, and for a sense of scale, a quarter. The camera and a couple lenses can fit in a jacket pocket. The camera and a couple lenses are smaller than most 35mm SLR bodies. Amazing.

Read more »

World Photography Day

Posted 2011.08.19 7.59 in Photography by Stephanie

Happy World Photography Day everyone!

I’ve never heard of it before but apparently it exists and it’s a thing.

World Photography Day

 

Linking URLs on the TV

Posted 2011.08.15 20.28 in Computers/Internet/Technology, Music/Movies/TV by Stephanie

Here’s something that has been bugging me for about the last 5 years or so.¬†When you see a URL on the TV, why can’t you just click it and have the link open up on your browser on your computer?

Ok I know the TV isn’t usually connected to the computer. Doesn’t matter. What about the digital hub stuff that they’ve been going on about for a few years? Between all the digital devices we’ve got in our homes, there should be a way to make this happen.

If the rumours of an Apple-branded television are true, then I expect this has to be one of the features. Click a link on the tv screen and it opens on your iPad or your Mac. So you can keep watching the show, while you follow the link.

Found Film #3

Posted 2011.08.14 9.17 in Hobbies, Photography by Stephanie

In my travels last week, I happened upon some ‘junker’ cameras in a local thrift store. These were modern P&S dime-a-dozen types that I’d normally not give a second glance to. What did catch my eye though, was that one of them had a roll of film in it.

For a couple dollars, I thought what the heck – I bought the camera, to have a go at the film. Getting it home, I quickly figured out why the camera had been abandoned. The lens zooming mechanism was jammed, so when the camera was turned ‘on’ the lens would try to move to the active position, but would lock up then the little LCD screen would show “E” for error.

I fiddled with it for a bit, determined that it was ‘dead’ in this state, so put it in the darkbag. In there, I opened the back, and going by feel, I removed the 35mm can and then carefully pulled the exposed film off the take-up spool, and rewound it back into the cannister.

Still going by feel, I could tell that there wasn’t a lot of film on the take-up spool – the camera had jammed early in the roll. Not a good sign – that meant there wouldn’t be many pictures, if there were any at all.

Of course, it was also a possibility that someone had opened the back and ruined all the film, so regardless of how many frames were taken, there was a good chance all of them would be ruined anyhow. So, nothing to do but keep on going.

Processing was a snap and when it was done, I could see as I was hanging the film to dry that there were only a couple images at the very start of the roll. It looked like there may have been four or five frames taken before the camera failed. Unfortunately, someone had indeed opened the back, which flashed out a few inches of film from the fourth frame back. The first three frames survived, although with some discolouration from the back being opened.

As with previous found films, it’s fun to see what you find, and then a mystery to try and figure out what is going on. Obviously this one is much more current, probably within the last 5 or 10 years, so there isn’t an historic feel to it. Though it’s an interesting note that they had at least two film cameras with them – the one these pictures came from, and the one visible in two of the three pictures.

Anyhow, it really is a bit of an adventure, going through the process with the found film, seeing if you get images or not, and if you do, trying to guess what the people are up to.

The camera itself was kaput and not worth fixing – though I did get a good CR123A lithium camera battery out of it – new, those cost more than I paid for the camera. The film was Kodak Max 400, souped for 20 minutes in (stale, exhausted) C-41 chemistry at room temperature (78° F).

X-Pro along the Niagara

Posted 2011.08.12 23.32 in Family/Friends, Photography by Stephanie

Today my sister and I went for an interesting drive and did some sightseeing, along the Niagara river. We actually started at Fort Erie right at the mouth of the river, then followed the Niagara Parkway northwards, all the way to Lake Ontario. And naturally, I brought a camera (or three) with me.

These shots were taken with my Zeiss Ikon Nettar, using Fuji Astia reversal (slide) film. I processed them at home in C-41 chemistry, hence the X-Pro (cross processing) in the title. The images all have a wierd otherworldly colour tone to them due to the cross processing.

I’m quite pleased with the results; the Nettar is a 61-year-old fully manual camera, and I took a guess on the exposure. Slide film is notoriously touchy for exposure levels, but I seem to have done a fairly good job at estimating the settings.

I took more pics with another camera, but that roll isn’t done yet so they’ll have to wait.