You are currently browsing the August, 2012 archives.

Tweeted 2012.08.31 14.05 in DID, Twitter by Stephanie

Black and White and 110 all over

Posted 2012.08.23 21.15 in Photography by Stephanie

So a few months back, the Lomography folks announced that they were reviving the 110 format film.

Also known as Pocket Instamatic film, 110 film comes in a little plastic cartridge. It uses a narrow strip of film 16mm wide, and you could get it in 12-shot and 24-shot sizes. The negative image was only about 17mm x 13mm, or a quarter of the size of a 35mm film negative.

I’ve got a handful of 110-format cameras in my collection, and until now I’d only been able to use them with out-dated (very expired) film. The results I’d been getting were quite poor.

Even when new the 110 format was not known for fantastic images – most of the cameras were cheaply made, with less-than-stellar lenses and inadequate exposure controls (or none at all). This resulted in grainy, fuzzy negatives that couldn’t be enlarged any more than small snapshots.

I think I’ve read that the last factory making 110 film closed up in 2009. Now, three years later, the Lomography people have brought it back. When they announced their new ‘Orca’ film, 110 format in black & white, I immediately ordered a couple rolls.

I’d never used B&W in 110 format, and was interested in trying it out. I also wanted to try out ‘fresh’ 110 film to see if I’d get noticably better results over the 10+ old stuff I’d been using so far. I loaded up my Pentax Auto 110 (an SLR system camera with interchangable lenses) and this past weekend I shot off a roll.

The results were pleasantly surprising. The camera is one of the best ever made for the 110 format, which helps of course. The film though came out very crisp with good contrast and a nice range of tones. Using a jeweler’s loupe, the film really looks fantastic.

The first six shots were taken in Eldorado Park, the seventh was shot from the car on the way home, and the last shot was taken at home, with a different camera. I moved the film from the Pentax into a Lomo Fisheye 110, to see how the Fisheye would work.

Film was processed at home in old T-Max 1:4 developer for 8 minutes. The scanned images are not as good as the film – my scanner seems to not be able to get a good read from 110 film. Perhaps because I’m trying to scan it from a 35mm carrier…

Road to Redscale

Posted 2012.08.21 10.29 in Photography by Stephanie

Last week I was off for a day, on a little road trip to visit my friends Athena and Jason at a cottage somewhere in the vicinity of West Guildford. Naturally I brought a camera.

It was the Lomo LC-A+ which I’d loaded with their Redscale XR film. I’ve had mixed results with Redscale in the past… and this time was no different. It varies wildly between underexposed and sort-of-acceptable. If you intentionally over-expose, you can get some more-lifelike colours. If you let it underexpose, you get deeper reds and oranges.

Unfortunately, although I brought the camera, I didn’t actually get much chance to use it. The (three-hour) drive home had some opportunities for playing around with it. Then this past weekend I finished off the roll at a local park along the Credit River.

There’s nothing particularily memorable about any of the shots, but I enjoy the experimentation now and then. Playing with film, playing with light, and playing with chemistry.

Loafer’s Lake Park

Posted 2012.08.20 8.33 in Photography by Stephanie

A couple weeks ago I took a walk around Loafer’s Lake, a small manmade lake in the north end of town. I was looking for some subject matter for photography, and water is one of my favorites. The Etobicoke Creek flows around the lake too, so it was twice as fun.

I’d taken two cameras, loaded with different kinds of film. I developed the first one right after the little excursion but was unhappy with the results. The camera was a Leica AF-C1 – a plastic autofocus, probably made by Minolta, but with the Leica branding. It was disappointing.

The other camera was the Lomography LC-A+ and it performed rather better, loaded with generic ISO-800 colour print film.

My Eagle Library

Posted 2012.08.19 9.06 in Computers/Internet/Technology by Stephanie

In my recent electronics adventures, I’ve had to learn to use Eagle, and in using Eagle, I’ve had to create some parts layouts.

I’ve a handful of parts (packages and symbols) set up. A few are mostly for reference, eg. items I created in order to make the schematics of my Thermostat V3, or the current prototype of my ISEB-6. The symbols are ok, but the packages (board footprints) are not tested and probably not accurate.

Other parts, that I have set up while working on the ISEB-6 Mark-II are more certain, eg. the TQFP-44 footprint for the ATMega1284P, surface mount TMP-36, et cetera. These parts’ footprints are tested and known good.

I’ve left comments in the library to indicate which ones are known to be good and which ones aren’t.

You can download the library by clicking right here: Stephanie’s Eagle Library.

Cats & Their Toy Mice

Posted 2012.08.18 10.19 in Cats by Stephanie

I think it’s kind of cute that the cats tend to keep their toys all together. I’m sure it’s just coincidence or whatever, but they play with the toy mice then when they’re done playing, the toy mice all end up in a little group.

Except there was something… unusual about the collection of toy mice, this morning.

Maybe don’t read on, if you’re easily squicked out.

Read more »

More Purple PCB Goodness

Posted 2012.08.17 20.41 in Computers/Internet/Technology by Stephanie

Whilst working on the ISEB-6 Mark-II, I have also been preparing some peripherals to work with the latest greatest version of the Electronic Bracer. It seems obvious really, that ontop of everything else, the ISEB-6 should be capable of turning off annoying televisions.

This tiny circuit board (less than one square inch) houses the circuitry for a totally self-contained TV-B-Gone. Pictured below are two populated and one bare board.

Designed to be triggered by another microprocessor rather than a manual push-button, this miniature TV-B-Gone will be integrated into the new ISEB-6 – providing TV off-turning abilities, built right into a wrist-mounted platform!

As evidenced by the Purple PCBs, these boards were fabbed via OSHPark, for only $5 for the three of them. Have I mentioned how much of a fan I am of Laen’s OSHPark service? Yeah, Laen rocks.